A Snack Well Worth Waiting For

loading Ban chien kuih.

These delicacies can be enjoyed at breakfast, tea or supper and with its crust thin and crispy, or thick and satisfying.

Made from a simple base of flour and eggs, ban chien kuih is a popular Hokkien delicacy. It comes with a flavoursome crust filled with crushed peanuts, sugar and margarine, and is usually cooked in one large pan, then cut and divided into slices for sale. And that’s only one of its delicious variations – ban chien kuih is made and savoured by many communities: the Malays and Indians call it apam balik or apong balik, while it is known as min chien kuih in Singapore and dai gao min in Cantonese-influenced towns such as Ipoh and KL.

The origin of the pancake’s name in Penang is based on its Hokkien pronunciation, “ban chien”, meaning “slow-cooked” in English.


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