Aiming for developed yet healthy cities

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Anthony Capon’s first trip to Penang was as a medical student in 1981, and 30-odd years later, he is stunned by how much Penang has changed. “One of the things that hits you quickly is the motorcar.” (He meant that figuratively.) “The people are still welcoming and friendly, but the physical place has changed radically. The buildings are bigger, the roads are more congested and there’s much more pollution.”

Capon has good reason to be concerned. A public health physician, he is also the director of the International Institute for Global Health at United Nations University, which is based on the UKM Medical Centre campus in KL.


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