Convent Green Lane Stretches Tall Again

loading SMK Convent Green Lane's new RM2.5mil school block now stands tall beside the school field.

Enrolment rates are flagging in missionary schools throughout the country, but SMK Convent Green Lane’s new building should help reverse the trend.

Convent schools – and missionary schools in general – have provided education in Malaysia since long before Independence. Establishing their first school on foreign soil in Malaysia in 1852 (Convent Light Street in George Town), the French Catholic religious order of the Infant Jesus Sisters (IJS) grew their base of schools here until World War II, establishing over 50 learning institutions across the nation.

Since then, all convent schools in the country have been nationalised and are now categorised as government-aided schools, with the salaries of staff being provided by the federal government. Other small allocations, like contributions for utility expenses, are also often offered but on the whole, funds for projects and the maintenance of the buildings largely rests on the Boards of Governors (BOGs) and the schools themselves.


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